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Rapunzel and Flynn Rider Run a Half Marathon (VIDEO!)

Hi friends!

My husband aka personal videographer extraordinaire just finished our recap video for the 2014 Disneyland Half Marathon. Scroll down to the bottom if you just want to watch the video and don’t want to read my rambling.

To sum up, I think this may have been the best race yet. Here are 8 things that I absolutely loved about this year’s Disneyland Half.

  1. The weather! After last year’s humid nightmare I was praying for relief this time around. The uncharacteristic humidity we experienced in the weeks leading up to the race had me so nervous. Mother Nature pulled through. The morning was pleasantly overcast (which is a runner’s dream), not too hot, not too cold, and just a teeeensy bit of humidity to make sweating actually feel good.
  2. Roomy corrals. I don’t know this for certain, but I feel that they must have added more corrals this year and designated less people in each. The past couple of years our corral has been so overcrowded (probably largely due to earlier corral starters moving back to run with friends which is allowed but makes the back corrals overstuffed), that we actually got bumped into a later corral. No runner likes that. You want to start as close to the A, B, C world as possible. This year we had plenty of room and no bumpage.
  3. Plenty of water. Last year was the first time ever that the course ran out of water at some stops. I blame the insane heat and humidity but it left me woefully unprepared and dehydrated. Super bummer.This year runDisney obviously stocked up. No lack of water on the course for me.
  4. Our costumes! My favorite ever. I simply love Rapunzel, and Flynn Rider is definitely the swooniest Disney dude since Prince Eric. Perfect for a pair of running newlyweds. Plus, thanks to Rapunzel, I developed a new item for Whimsy Do. Flower braid-in extensions.
  5. New race shirts. FINALLY runDisney created gender specific (in cut only, not style) race shirts for the Disneyland Half. The new shirt fit like a dream, and the color is super cute. Love it.
  6. Our first race as a married couple. Enough said 🙂
  7. This marked my 10th half marathon. How did that happen!
  8. Fancy dinner. The day after the race Brad and I spent our requisite day of celebration in the parks. Since this year marks something special, I thought it was finally time we checked out Carthay Circle. So elegant. So delicious.

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magic recovery drink aka chocolate milkshake from Denny's

magic recovery drink aka chocolate milkshake from Denny’s

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In the park

Loved Rapunzel so much I did a little Disneybounding in the park the next day. I wore my flower braid-ins...

Loved Rapunzel so much I did a little Disneybounding in the park the next day. I wore my flower braid-ins…

... and brought Pascal along for the ride.

… and brought Pascal along for the ride.

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Pretty darn excited to get this button at City Hall

Pretty darn excited to get this button at City Hall

And then of course there were a few downsides.

  1. No cheerleaders. This was the first year ever that my Mom and Dennis weren’t able to make it down for the race. They are always there to cheer us on, and they usually run one of the events themselves, but due to scheduling it just didn’t happen this year. We really missed them but they cheered from afar.
  2. No Disneyland dream pool. For three of the years we’ve run this event we splurged on stays at Disneyland resort hotels. We’ve now stayed at all three, once each. My favorite hotel is the Grand Californian for its rustic beauty, but the Disneyland Hotel Pool has everyone beat. It’s an absolute dream. Huge, festive, and has a truly thrilling waterslide. Not to mention the proximity to Trader Sam’s and all the tiki drinks you could ever want. It’s the best and I missed it. This year Brad and I stayed off property. Pool was sub-par, and no tiki drinks. Though we did have an amazing two-bedroom suite with a full kitchen.
  3. Foot pain. I’ve been running for a while in Newtons. While I love them for anything up to 6 miles, I learned through this race that any mileage over 6 my feet can’t seem to take. Around mile 7 I developed serious shooting pain in my left metatarsal. I was actually concerned I may have a fracture. Of course I ran through it, like ya do, and the pain ebbed for a while. At mile 11 it hit me again to the point I actually had to walk. That definitely threw off my flow for the last three miles. I had been on track for a PR before that happened :(. There’s always something to keep that elusive PR just out of reach. I guess it was an educational moment. I now know that I’m going to need a bit more shoe for the marathon. Did someone say more shoes? Ok if I must.

Those are the only negative points I can think of and they weren’t super biggies. Everything was pretty much just incredibly fun, celebratory, and relaxing as usual. Once again I’m left looking forward to Disneyland Half Marathon 2015. But first, we have to get through the WDW Marathon. *Gulp*

What you’ve been waiting for: VIDEO!

Running the Home Stretch

We are almost to Tahiti. We are almost to Tahiti! I find this so hard to believe, as Tahiti has been a bit of a distant dream for these past three years, despite our active plan to get there. The number of miles left to run has remained in the 4 digit area code for what feels like so long.

Until now.

I truly can’t believe it but we collectively have less than 800 miles to run. Less than 800 miles to white sandy beaches, crystalline waters, sea creatures, tropical cocktails, and exotic adventures. Less than 800 miles to our Honeymoon!

That 800 miles will fly by. How do I know this? Because we’ve created a built-in carrot to insure that we keep on track for this final stretch. It’s called the Walt Disney World Marathon on January 11. If Brad and I stick to our training schedule, which we simply must if we have any hope of finishing our first marathon, we will arrive running on the shores of Tahiti the week of December 15. Just in time for Christmas. Happy Christmas to us! We won’t actually make travel plans and get there until sometime in the spring, but this Christmas you can bet our hearts will be in French Polynesia.

The road has been paved with literal blood, sweat, and tears. As well as vomit, panic attacks, dirt, chaffed skin, plantar fasciitis, bursitis, and sunburns. Amidst the injuries and struggles we’ve also had joy, laughs, adventures, and some of the best memories in our 7 years together so far. That’s what running is all about. The incredible beauty in the challenge.

After Tahiti Brad will likely scale back on mileage and FINALLY get rid of the pesky plantar fasciitis that plagues him. I see a bicycle and a swim cap in Brad’s future. Me? I think I’ll stick with running for awhile. It’s become a very important part of me. Running makes me feel strong, sane, and grounded. As long as I’m injury free (knock on wood) I think I’ll always be running somewhere. The question is, where should we run to next?

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800 countdown

10 Reasons to Run a Half Marathon

I didn’t realize this until my husband pointed it out to me a couple of weeks ago, but the 2014 Disneyland Half Marathon marked my 10th half marathon completed. I can’t believe it! I ran my first 13.1 miles at the 2010 Disneyland Half. How fitting that my 10th be at the same event. Full circle. Warm and fuzzies. MILEstone.

Rapunzel

 

In honor of my 10th half marathon-iversary, I thought I’d pay homage to the distance. It’s a great race. I started to think about why I love it so much and as I brainstormed it occurred to me to loop other folks in on the discussion. I’m a member of a fantastic Disney nerd running group on Facebook called Team #runDisney. It’s an amazingly supportive and enthusiastic group of runners. From novices to elites, everyone in this group comes together to share the love of our sport. So who better to answer the question, why do you run the half marathon, than my brothers and sisters in arms (or legs) over at Team #runDisney. The following is a mash-up of their answers as well as my own. I give you:

10 reasons to run a Half Marathon.

  1. Accountability
    • It’s all well and good to say you’re going to run 20 miles a week (or whatever), but let’s be serious, you won’t. You’ll get home from work and you’ll feel all tired and sludgy and give in to the couch calling out to you. Couch says “Hey you, yeah you whose derriere I love so much when it snuggles up on me with a glass of wine and a bag of hot Cheetos. Come put your feet up and watch the new episode of Scandal. It’s far too late and that wine is far too delicious. No need to run today.” That’s what the couch says. You can’t listen. You need something to pull you away. Sign up for a half marathon. Paying that kind of money to run a race will keep you motivated to keep going, keep training. Seeing that countdown widget on your phone everyday will remind you of what you promised yourself. Accountability. Plus, I just used wine and hot Cheetos in the same sentence. God help me.
  2. All about the bling
    • Yes I realize it’s just a cheap piece of metal made for 10 cents somewhere over seas probably by an exploited labor force. But man, I can’t help it, I love my medals. How many instances in life do you get a well-deserved medal placed around your neck for something you accomplished. There’s a reason there’s an established saying “they should give me a medal ” when you bust your butt for something. In this case, they will!
  3. Set an example
    • Whether it’s your kids, students, nieces, spouse, or co-workers, you have the incredible opportunity to set an example for someone around you. At a time when the dangers of obesity are finally starting to sink in, we’re all having healthier discussions about body image, and nutrition often takes center stage in the national debate, thank God that it seems like the world may be getting healthier. Maybe? Hopefully? The truth is we don’t know if all these studies and articles and dialogues are actually doing anything. What I do know is that I’ve had at least three people tell Brad or I directly that our running habit inspired them to get active again. That’s amazing. If something I’ve done changes one person’s life for the better, worth it. Actions speak so much louder than words (coming from the girl who writes a BLOG! *facepalm*).
  4. Raise Money/Awareness
    1. Runners raise a shit-ton of money. Millions of dollars every year. In doing so they take the opportunity to educate their friends and families about causes that matter to them. They provide living proof that positive change begins with doing something for yourself but it can’t END there. Change must be paid forward. One of my favorite examples of this phenomenon is Sean Astin’s #run3rd campaign. It sums up the philosophy perfectly. Run 1st for myself. Run 2nd for my family. Run 3rd for YOU. Of course “You” being an embodiment of whatever dedication compels you forward; be it a cause, a loved one, a memory, a statement. Give it away, be a part of something bigger. Make effort meaningful. Running does these things. Cool, huh?
  5. FOOD
    • With a capital F! Ok people, I’m not saying you should gorge yourself or anything. That would totally undermine the point I made above about setting a healthy example. But I’m not gonna lie, food tastes waaaay better after you just ran 13.1 miles and know that every single calorie has already been burned off. Most of the time of course you should be healthy and mindful of what you put in your body. Well, actually, all the time. Yes we should be mindful of that all the time. You should see how mindfully I down a chocolate milkshake and stack of buttermilk pancakes with a side of hash browns after I run a half marathon. In all honestly, I’m telling you, when you run consistently you just don’t have to stress about food as much. I never used to be able to eat whatever I wanted without gaining weight just thinking about a few extra calories. Since I’ve been running really consistently I don’t think about it, and I don’t gain. Admittedly, I haven’t lost weight either, but I’m ok with that. The relief of going to the grocery store and just buying what my cravings tell me to buy is so freeing. (News flash, when you get out of diet mode and listen to real cravings, you’ll probably crave healthy foods like fruits, veggies, and protein. True story). But let me repeat my main point, eating WHATEVER you want after you just ran a half marathon is a gift from above.
  6. Fits into your busy schedule
    • Brad and I just started training this week for the Walt Disney World Marathon. I have to admit, looking at the training calendar I can tell that from here until January running is going to dominate our weekends. Once we get over 14 mile runs, you’re talking about carving out at least 3 hours of straight running every Saturday. That’s *just* the running. That doesn’t include warm-up time, cool-down time, and recovery time. Running over 14 miles is going to knock us out the rest of the day, and we’ll be doing it about 10 weekends in a row. Bye bye social life! Don’t get me wrong, I’m so excited for the challenge and am committed to making a social sacrifice to get ready for Disney World come January, but let me tell you the great thing about a half marathon. It’s challenging, quite challenging, requires a good amount of training and consistency, but is not SO challenging that it dominates your life. You can train for a half marathon without neglecting your family, and while maintaining a social life. And at the end of it all you’ll still feel so accomplished after running that race! It’s the perfect distance for we amateur athletes who still want lives.
  7.  Runcations
    • Running a half marathon can provide great incentive to travel. It might be hard to convince your spouse to fly across the country for a 5k or even a 10k. The half marathon is that magic distance. Your family will be so impressed by your effort and dedication to the challenge, they will readily jump on board to fly to Boston so you can run the inaugural Heartbreak Hill Half Marathon. Tempt them with a Duck Tour and lobster rolls and you’ll start to see that half marathons can be the markers on your traveler’s map. And you won’t be SO beaten up after 13.1 miles that you won’t have any steam left to enjoy your surroundings. A marathon could put you out of commission. A half marathon will leave you feeling celebratory and revitalized with some extra calories to spare (see point #5). Half Marathons have taken Brad and I to Monterey, Big Sur, San Diego, and of course Disneyland!
  8.  Camaraderie
    • I’ve always gravitated more toward solitary sports than teams. Does that make me a creeper who doesn’t like people? I don’t think so. It’s just that team sports give me so much anxiety. Too much pressure!. However tennis, swimming, cycling, running. I can get behind all of these. The funny thing is I feel more supported by my fellow runners of the world than I ever did on a team played in school. Perhaps because we don’t compete against each other, we compete against ourselves (talking about non-elites of course). I run to beat my own time, not someone else’s. I don’t disappoint anyone if I can’t finish a race. No runner (me) has panic attacks about letting the team down. This leaves 100% room for positive camaraderie with my fellow runners and no where is that more apparent than at a half marathon. Thousands of eager athletes willing each other to succeed. I want them all to succeed so bad! I can’t tell you how many times I’ve cried hearing the stories of what my running friends have overcome in their journeys. We share tips with each other, we swap horror stories, we salute new PRs and we comfort epic disappointments. Seems like almost every major thread I read on Facebook is chalk full of dissent, argument, and trolls, except for my running groups. They are a virtual haven. In my running groups I can’t say I’ve ever come across a single troll. I may extol the virtues of the solitary athlete, but I’m not-so-secretly dependent on my “team.”
  9. Running is cheaper than therapy
    • There are many ways to maintain positive mental health; and running does it for me. The half marathons that I run every year keep an attainable but challenging carrot dangling out in front of me. I have something to look forward to which is always good for joy-making, and running after that carrot gets all kinds of fancy endorphins pumping through my blood and brain. Training will give you built-in “me time.” It will clear your head. It will help you manage stress. Half marathon training is honestly the best prescription for mental stability I’ve ever undertaken. Half marathon = happiness.
  10. Dreamcatching
    • Admit it, someone at some point in your life has made you feel incapable and bad. Whether that person was a bully, a pesky relative, or yourself. Someone made you think you couldn’t do things like run 13.1 miles. Oh the satisfaction of proving someone wrong. Run a half marathon because someone at some point told you that you couldn’t. Run a half marathon because you need tangible proof that any dream is catchable.

 

To finish, I want to share some quotes from the Team #runDisney thread that inspired me to write this, and continues to inspire me keep on runnin’. (Please apply (sic) to all typos, these comments came from the grammar vacuum known as Facebook). I hope you can feel the inspiration oozing from your computer screen, onto your desk, and down into your feet! These people have overcome and accomplished some amazing things. If they can do it, so can YOU!

I love running with people who are running their first half marathons and getting to share the experience of something I really love. It’s amazing to see all the emotions they go through and to be that voice of confidence and encouragement.

I run because I was told I couldn’t. And 8 years later, when I ended up in a wheelchair, I switched to a racing chair because running had become part of who I am. And it’s taught me way too many things to list…

Running ten miles on a Saturday morning means nachos for lunch don’t count!!

I had a stroke about 6 years ago and I run because I can and I know it’s a luxury!

Easier than a marathon and more challenging than a 10K. Just the right distance and I always feel accomplished at the end.

Because people look at me and say, you don’t look like a runner……

I run all distances for fun… 5Ks and 10Ks I want to go fast. Fulls require focus… With the Half, I can be a bit more casual and enjoy the race from start to finish.

Sometimes I don’t have a lot of control of many things in my life -but I always have control of me. It empowers me to stay strong through uncertain times.

I signed up for my first time last year because I can’t seem to accomplish my personal goal at work and needed to know that nothing could hold me back from what I wanted to do if there was no one in my way….

To raise money for a local charity and in honor of a friend who used to run marathons but died of brain cancer two years ago.

I took 20 years off of Running. Last year my son started Kindergarten. I wanted to set an example of exercise. I started with the Rock N Roll Half Marathon in Las Vegas last November. When November rolls around the weekend of the Disney Avenger Race I will have run 9 half marathons in a year’s time. If someone told me last August that I would have run 9 Half Marathons I would have said they were crazy. Yet 5 down, 1 this weekend, then 3 to go!!!

Most of my life I have been a big guy, a couple years ago lost over 100 pounds. I remember how excited I was when I ran my first mile without stopping for the first time in my life. This will be my 2nd half marathon. I don’t run because I can, I run because all my life I couldn’t.

I started running three and a half years ago after my son passed away following a car accident. That’s why I run to honor (him). He was a country runner and rugby player in high school and we had planned to someday do a half marathon together. I’ve done many half marathons and I have three or four more planned in the next 6 months. I run to feel close to and honor him. That’s why I run.

I find a different kind of fulfillment when I run halfs. It’s changed me inside letting me know I am strong and (can) accomplish anything!

I had a rough childhood, survived a relationship that could have ended my life, and emotional struggles from it all.  My boys don’t know all this from my past, but I want them to know that strength comes in many forms. Maybe getting that medal is physical validation of what I conquered internally. I also love that I can have them see me run and we can have a family vacation together at our favorite place on the planet. Double bonus!

I started running a few years ago. Did the Disney World 5K at Animal Kingdom and it was amazing!! I cried at the end!! Jumped straight to Half Marathon and was hooked… still cry at the finish!! LOL

For the amazing feeling you get when you finish the race. That natural high lasts for days and carries over into your normal everyday life!

Why you ask… “We gain strength, and courage, and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face… We must do that which we think we cannot.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

 

 

 

Running With Cheetahs

I have been remiss. I failed to post a recap of my favorite running weekend of the year so far. This May 4th (May the Fourth be with you), Brad and I ran with cheetahs, giraffes, elephants, gazelles, rhinos, and one very friendly camel. Cool, right?? Can you believe it?! I wish it were all true, but the spirit of the sentence is right. We ran the San Diego Safari Park Half Marathon.

I love an excuse to go to San Diego. I’m not sure how it got the nickname America’s Finest City, but it’s kind of true. There’s just “something” about it. San Diego has an appealing quality. Coronado is a dream. La Jolla is a paradise. And Gaslamp is a blast. Enough about the town though, let’s talk about the race.

Saturday we drive to Road Runners Sports to check in and get our bibs and bags. We pick up our shirts, sign our waivers and yeah, whatever. That is all fine. A race packet pick-up in a huge running specialty store though? Quite a sly trick there, race planners. Like luring a kid into a candy store, or an ax murderer into an ax store. Oh the temptation. This store is awesome.

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I want all the shoes

I want all the shoes

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Seriously this store has me in its grip. I almost make it out alive. Just as one of the shoe sales reps almost coerces me into a new pair, he begins to tell me about their policy that you can return running shoes for up to 60 days after purchase (or was it 90? I can’t remember) no questions asked, no matter how much you’ve worn them, for a full refund. Now I’m sure even non-runners can understand the value in this. You just really don’t know about a pair of shoes, ESPECIALLY running shoes, until you get them on your feet and spend a day (or a run) in them. No matter how much you half-heartedly jog around the store as if that’s actually providing you with useful information, until you’ve got those shoes on your sweaty swollen dogs for 5 miles or more, you don’t know if they’re really right for you. So this whole 60 day return window is AHmazing. I love this store. Anyway, I digress. The point I mean to make is that this concept has me wondering, what happens to all of those sad unwanted shoes? Poor lost shoes. I ask the guy, “You can’t resell them right? So what do you do? Do you donate them?” Well well well. I’m glad I asked. Turns out they DO resell them, heavily discounted, and only in this store. The guy leans in close to give me the scoop. “Actually, you head around back, see? At’s what we calls our lightly-loved shoe department, see? We cleans ’em on up, gives ’em a second chance at life. Head on back, ask for my boy Maurice, he’ll hook you up.” Actually he didn’t talk like a 1940s gangster at all, and there was no one named Maurice; but the lightly loved shoe department is a very real place.

I scoot on over to Brad who is seriously considering a purchase of some Hoka One Ones (Brad’s nursing plantar fasciitis and will do almost anything at this point to cure it, including buying new shoes that aren’t from Ross). I lean in close to Brad’s ear and give him the scoop about the secret lightly-loved department behind the store. We hurriedly make our way outside and around the back. At first we don’t see anything but more of the industrial strip mall we find ourselves in on this warm San Diego day. I’m feeling like this sales guy mobster was giving me the runaround. Then, all of a sudden, there it is. A wall of the most heavily discounted first class running shoes I have ever seen. It’s basically heaven.

After spending much more time and money than planned, necessary, or budgeted, Brad and I pull ourselves away from the lightly loved shoe department with a pair of Hokas for me (how did I get roped into the Hokas? Well they look like mermaid shoes and they were on sale. What do you want from me?), a pair of Hokas for Brad (that super stuffed cushioning felt darn good on his pf), and a pair of Newton Gravitys for Brad as well (Newtons are so flippin’ expensive so to find a pair of practically new ones for 75% off is hard to turn down. I convinced him).

So there we are, two running nerds in our matching Hoka One One shoes, waddling out of the running store two big bags heavier than we intended. No regrets. I love a good bargain. And we love our new shoes.

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Enough about shopping, let’s get to the race.

We raced! Add another Half Marathon to our growing list. The San Diego Safari Park Half Marathon is tops in my book, but there are some things you need to know. Contrary to my perhaps misguided preconception you will not be running with or near wild animals. I guess I’m so used to Disney races where I know you’ll get to run as many miles as they can squeeze in the parks. I assumed this, being an entertainment park, would be the same. It didn’t occur to me, of course, that 8,000 or so loudly thumping heavily breathing runners might sound like a stampede to a sensitive wild animal and oh, I don’t know, spook them? Yeah, you don’t really run near the animals. Duh. Makes total sense.

Most of the race is through beautiful nearby Escondido, and truly, it is beautiful. And not without animals! We run alongside lots of cows! As you approach the Safari Park you run up a hill. The most intense hill I have ever seen on a race course. Seriously, it is like a joke. It is as if someone plopped Runyon Canyon smack dab at mile 8 of a half marathon. Funny right???

I’ll let the video tell the rest of the story of our lovely run. There is one more thing I wanted to mention about this event, but I hesitate because I don’t want to end on a sour note. I’ll just write it out and then think of something nice to say after so we won’t end on bad terms, k?

They ran out of medals. As I cross the finish line I am handed what looks like a laminated backstage pass. At first I think, oh, these are the medals? Well, I guess times is tough at the old Safari Park. But then the volunteer explains to me that they have run out of medals and I would receive mine in the mail in 4-6 weeks. Ugh. Listen, that’s fine, I get it. I’ve dealt with many events and I know that logistical nightmares happen. The wrong number of this get ordered, or the vendor sends that to the wrong address, or whatever. It still completely sucks, and in that moment I am very disappointed to say the least. I’m not one of those runners that gets super into the “bling” as they say, but I do enjoy a good medal. I enjoy what it represents. However the ONLY time I really enjoy my medal is the day I run the race. That’s the day I wear it around my neck proudly and wait for people to yell Congratulations so I can shoot them a coy smile and say Thank You So Much. I can’t do that 4-6 weeks from race day. I could, but I’d be kind of a dummy.

my bitter face

my bitter face

6 weeks later

6 weeks later

That’s all I’ll say about that. It was a major bummer, I was unfairly bitter about it for approximately three hours. I currently do not blame the Safari Park in any way (we’re cool Safari Park), and I’ve let it go. Things happen. Moving on.

I promised I wouldn’t end on a bitter note so here are some other things, and these far outweigh the medal debacle. Included in your race entry fee is FREE admission to the Safari Park for the entire day (hear that Disney?? FREE!) which is the coolest thing ever. It’s a truly beautiful park; a “zoo” that you can feel at least half way good about. Did you know the Safari Park used to be the breeding facility for the animals that would end up at the San Diego Zoo? That’s why there is so much land and it resembles as closely as possible the animals’ natural habitat, to keep the animals healthy, calm, and in the right mood to get it on. Someone over the years got the idea to open it up to the public. Isn’t that cool?

Also, we saw a cheetah run y’all. Up close and personal. Did you know cheetahs can reach speeds of 70 mph? Next time you’re SPEEDING on the freeway (cause 70 is SPEEDING you guys), think about that. A cheetah running on the freeway could get a speeding ticket. We saw a cheetah run. So. Cool. I actually cried. I’m totally not kidding. I choked up. It was an amazing sight.

All around it was an incredible weekend. I love San Diego, I love my husband, I love running, I love animals. All these things at once. Can’t go wrong. Definitely doing it again next year (if nothing else to get back to that lightly-loved secret 1940s mobster shoe store! Shh!).

And now, the actual best part of this post, the video. Enjoy!

Two Feet and Four Wheels: Discovering SoCal

In 6 short days I will embark upon the greatest adventure of my life thus far which involves a trip down the aisle. Current emotions equal excitement, eagerness, nerves, stress, apprehension, glee, gratefulness, disbelief, joy, and happiness, among many others. The last 6 ½ years with Brad can be summed up by a quote from the eternally wise Winnie-the-Pooh.

“I knew when I met you an adventure was going to happen.”

Fitting then that our second to last week in SoCal would involve a running adventure in our own extended backyard.

As I mentioned in a previous post, a few weeks ago Buick contacted me about participating in their summer “Runs Worth the Drive” challenge in partnership with MapMyRun.com. They would give me a beautiful Buick Verano for a week and all I would have to do is A) drive it around and B) discover new running routes not in my immediate neighborhood. This proposition was right up my alley. An invitation to adventure with a fancy new car? C’mon. Well the week unfolded and it did not disappoint. Brad and I (and our friend Neiman, too) had a truly memorable week of running.
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We started by taking on a couple of evening runs just a stone’s throw from our Venice abode. These routes are close enough to get the run in after work, but far enough that you have to drive to get there. First stop was Playa del Rey. We parked near our gym along Lincoln Blvd and ran up the hill to and through the campus of Loyola Marymount University. Do you live in Los Angeles and want to discover a new appreciation of your city? Head on up to LMU and gaze out at the view of the City of Angels. From the sea to downtown, the sprawl is rather incredible to behold all at once.
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The next evening’s run was in the same general area, but instead of running up the hills we ran out to sea! There is a fantastic bike path that runs parallel to Culver Blvd and continues out along the Marina until it spills into the ocean. This evening included crossing paths with some friendly bunny rabbits, a gorgeous rainbow sherbet sunset, and a sneak peek at some 4th of July fireworks. This was one of those evenings where you stop and realize that taking just an ever so small detour out of your daily habits can yield the loveliest surprises. That’s really what this week was all about.

The week with the Buick culminated in two challenging but memorable destination runs. On Saturday we drove down to gorgeous Laguna Beach, with friend Chris Neiman in tow, to see what Orange County would offer us. I let Brad choose the route, my role was just to drive, and the trail he picked very nearly resulted in calling off the wedding. I’ve got one word: hills. Hills! On a very warm Saturday afternoon in Laguna we began running… up a mountain. I truly had to stop and repeat to myself “this isn’t Brad’s fault, you let him decide the route, he didn’t know the terrain any better than you did.” A few repeats of that mantra, deep breaths and the wedding was back on.
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I’m being hyperbolic of course but you know the old trope of cursing your trainer’s name as he pushes you to your max. In this scenario Brad filled in for the role of trainer that I needed to take my suffering out on. Poor guy. He’s so patient. As soon as we made it to the top of the hill the grumblings completely faded away and all I could do was bask in the beauty of my surroundings. In the distance we could see the Pacific ocean with Catalina perched on the marine layer like Brigadoon, fading into the sea fog. Beauty.
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There is incentive for me to hill train. Running downhill is my bag. I stabilize my core, release some space in my hip flexors, and let my feet fly. I love being able to hit an 8:00 min pace, something I’m just not able to maintain on flat ground. Speed. Pure bliss.

Sunday was our last run of the week and our last day with the Buick. Even though my dance card was full with wedding to-dos, the entire week I’d had my sights set on a run in Ventura. The little towns just north of L.A.; Oxnard, Ventura, Santa Barbara, are my favorite destinations for quick weekend getaways. I could actually see myself living in one of these sleepy little towns if Brad and I ever feel compelled to leave L.A. We’ll see.

We drove on up to Ventura in hopes of finding a nice route along the sea. I participated in the search this time to avoid another test of our relationship if Brad took us up another mountain. After doing some research of Ventura running routes on MapMyRun.com we found a good prospect along a path next to somewhere called Emma Wood state beach. A quick plug for MapMyRun. I must admit that since Brad got me a Garmin Forerunner for my birthday I’ve kind of left behind the world of mobile running apps. Now I’m all running watch all the way. MapMyRun.com offers some perks though that I simply love and won’t leave behind. I love being able to trace new routes ahead of time to make sure I get the right mileage in. This is especially useful for long runs where you do NOT want to find yourself at mile 12, not knowing where to turn to make sure you get to 20. Plan ahead. I also love the ability to crowdsource routes. I had no idea where to run in Ventura or Laguna, for example, but MapMyRun has a great search feature where you can see where other runners have ventured in that area, see how popular the particular route is, and again, plan ahead. For running the adventure comes in the run itself. It shouldn’t come in the form of surprises like being stranded on a dead end road 15 miles from home without cell service or water. Plan ahead.

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Pay no attention to our splits. They’re a bit slower than usual. There was much stopping, slowing, and gazing. No other way to describe it but an incredibly fun run.

Brad has once again turned out an incredible and quick video of the weekend’s Buick/MapMyRun/SoCal adventure, so I’ll let it speak for itself. And thanks to my stepdad Paul for providing some original music! I’m sensing the beginning of a new collaboration :).

I’m so grateful for this experience to have come along when it did. I don’t know for sure, because I’ve never been married and don’t really know anything about anything, but I will hazard a guess that one of the secrets to a happy marriage is a sense of adventure and open-mindedness. Habits are important too. I love coming home after work, getting a quick 3 miles in along the Santa Monica beach, curling up with two kitties, a fiancé, and Dexter followed by an episode of Star Trek and Big Cat Diary. These are routines that bring me simple joy and simple joys are so valuable. But if they aren’t peppered with the occasional urge to breakout and discover something new, they get stale. I feel it happen during training. I get bored of the same 3, 4, or 6 mile runs along the same route. This week driving to unknown runs has revitalized my love of running, and I can’t help but take that lesson into my upcoming nuptials. I’m grateful that a sense of exploration comes naturally to our relationship. It’s something that I know we’ll always need to nurture, and running in new and adventurous places may be just what we need to remind us of that simple fact.

Thank you so much to Buick and MapMyRun.com for bringing this opportunity to Running to Tahiti. They sponsored this campaign but the opinions in this post are my own and I can honestly say that Buick makes a fantastic sedan. Smooth ride, luxurious amenities, and a sleek look. I loved driving it!

Until next time…

Runs Worth the Drive!

I read quite a few running blogs. Foremost because I like to connect with fellow runners/writers. The running community is just that, a community. Perhaps it’s because our sport is a lone one, we like to connect with each other whenever possible. Blogging does that. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t also want to see what other people were doing right. You see I often feel like I’m doing things wrong. I read other blogs that are clearly so incredibly popular and successful and I wonder what I should be doing. I read about bloggers getting complimentary entry into runDisney races (HOW DOES THAT HAPPEN??) and getting sent all kinds of swag for giveaways to increase readership, cross-promote, and network with potential sponsors. I see all of these things and feel there must be some sort of golden goose I can’t find. Last year I would say that all of that worried me. This year I said to hell with it. I didn’t start a blog to worry about all of that. I started a blog to write, to muse, to run, and to keep myself accountable on this adventure to Tahiti. So that’s what I’ve re-focused on in 2014. I stopped worrying about what other people were doing right, what I was doing wrong, and shifted my thinking to doing what I love: running and writing.

And wouldn’t you know it.

Things pick up steam. I’m going to make the moral of this story short so that I can get to to the meat of today’s news, so here it is, listen up. When you stop worrying about the destination and start focusing on the journey, you’ll discover yourself. Yes, the destination IS the journey. Also, life is too short to worry about being successful according to someone else’s standards, so always do what you love and do a good job. That will be a success.

That’s what happens. Really. I stopped worrying about the result of my blog and refocused on the content and it’s now more “successful” than ever. More importantly, it brings me great joy which was always the intention. I Now here’s my news!

Buick is partnering with MapMyRun for a summer campaign called Runs Worth the Drive which encourages runners to take strides outside of their habitual running locales and drive to new terrain, in addition to promoting a healthy and active summer. A few weeks ago Buick contacted me about being a featured blogger in this campaign!

Buick has loaned me a fancy new Verano Turbo this week with which I can drive to as many new running adventures as possible. I then map my route on MapMyRun.com and share my new runs with Buick and the rest of the world via social media. You can follow along at hashtag Driven2Run. It’s a pretty car.

 

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If you’ve been reading since the beginning (thank you), you may recall that the motivation for this blog was to write about the cross-section of running and traveling. Adventure is my middle name and my favorite thing to do on an adventure is to run. When I run in a new land I breathe it in deeper, feel the earth beneath my feet, and take pictures with my eyes. A new landscape gets in to your very pores when you run through it, and that’s how I take places with me. My most vivid memories of the city of Boston come from runs along the Charles or across Boston Common. I can practically smell the Colorado countryside right now thanks to the 3 miles Brad and I ran up a mountain. I love running when I travel. So the fact that Buick targeted Running to Tahiti for this summer campaign is pure serendipity and excitement. I now have not only an excuse, but real motivation to get my running butt out into greater Los Angeles and rediscover this beautiful city with my own two feet.

We get the Buick through next weekend, so next Saturday we’ll really adventure somewhere exciting and a bit remote to prove that the run is indeed worth the drive.

With all of that said I could use your help Angelenos. Where should we run??? Southern California is at our fingertips (or running shoes) and we could really use some suggestions. Please share either in the comments or on social media your favorite running routes in Los Angeles, greater Los Angeles, and Orange and Ventura counties. Use the hashtag #Driven2Run to follow the conversation.

Thanks to Buick and MapMyRun for inviting Running to Tahiti to be a part of this challenge. Brad and I so look forward to discovering SoCal anew!

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Why I Won’t Be Losing Weight For My Wedding

I could go on and on and on and on and on about female body issues. I could probably go on about male body issues as well. I haven’t really tried; but I’m sure I could. Today I’ll try not to go on too much, but ever since I got engaged there’s something I’ve been meaning to say. I won’t be losing my weight for my wedding. For several reasons.

There’s this strange expectation when you get engaged that you’ll want to get fit, lose weight, tone up, look perfect. I’m not going to bash the idea. I understand it. It’s a significant day. One in which dozens of people will all be looking at you, sizing you up whether they mean to or not; and one in which you’ve spent dollars, lots of dollars (probably thousands) to have your picture taken. You likely want to look your best. It doesn’t surprise me that getting fit and looking great become a priority to engaged ladies. What saddens me is that it often seems to become priority #1, and that our culture is obsessed with it.

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To each his own. I’m not here to judge anyone. If getting married is a catalyst for someone to get healthy, who am I to condemn that? My instinct is to criticize that we seem to equate thinness with worth in our society, and no where is that more apparent than the pressure put on a bride. But perhaps I’m projecting. Let me remove myself from the position of casting judgement and turn the focus inward. I’m only here to talk about my own experience, and if anyone out there can relate perhaps we’ll start to open our minds a bit about what it means to be a beautiful bride.

My entire life I’ve been in a perpetual state of trying to lose weight. Truly, for as long as I can remember. I went to my first Weight Watchers meeting when I was 12. I was a chubby kid. I got teased. It sucked. Make no mistake about the power of bullies on a sensitive young heart. I wish I had the magic elixir to protect my future children from the nonsense of bullies, but knowing that I don’t have it just as my own mother didn’t have it no matter how much she tried, keeps me up at night. Children can be cruel, and I let myself be a victim. I grew up throughout my teenage years always wanting to lose weight. Always. All. Ways. I begged my mom to let me do three-day crash diets that consisted of canned beets and plain hot dogs, cabbage soup diets, grapefruit juice fasts, the master cleanse, Atkins. All of it, I did it. And I lost weight a lot of the time. I fluctuated between being in a state of weight loss which made me feel FANTASTIC, and being in a state of weight gain which made me feel utterly worthless as a human being. I was addicted to dieting. A weight loss junkie. The highs were so high, the lows so low. But man, those highs. It’s a dangerous state. That being the pattern I allowed myself to grow up in, I began to equate happiness with weight loss.

I had these flights of fancy about what would force me to “finally lose the weight” in a once and for all kind of way, as if it wasn’t me in control, but an external force that could finally put the nail in the chubby coffin. I had some dream of a weight loss fairy Godmother in the form of these motivating life benchmarks. I thought going away to college would do it (apparently I’d never heard of the freshmen 15). Then I thought going off to London would do it (all those cute Brits. I had to be ready). Then I thought graduating from college would do the trick, or moving to L.A. After all, I couldn’t in any way participate in Los Angeles looking like “this.”

With all of those benchmarks come and gone, some hit, some missed, I thought there was one down the road that would be a surefire win. One moment in time that would surely be the catalyst for my final victory over the fat. That moment would be when I got engaged.

That would do the trick right? There’s no way I would allow myself to walk down the aisle looking chubs. And besides, it’s what women do, right? Then a funny thing happened.

I got engaged.

And I felt no desire to lose weight. It didn’t even cross my mind. In other significant moments throughout my life such as getting into college, getting asked to prom, getting cast in a TV show, the absolute first thing that entered my mind when these things happened was “I have to lose weight.” So believe me when I say that I was the most shocked of all when Brad put the ring on my finger and the first thing we did was go eat a lunch of grilled cheese sandwiches and salad covered in delicious ranch dressing, capped off with chocolate gelato.

So let me take a step back, because the truth is the weight monsters began to drift away a lot earlier. Namely, the moment I fell in love with Brad. That’s not meant to sound sappy because I’m actually a bit critical of myself for it. I’m disappointed in myself that it took the opinion of a male in my life to finally shift my thinking. But that’s the way it went down. Brad fell in love with me, all of me, especially me, with no condition that I lose weight. He didn’t say “oh yeah, I totally love you, but we’ll only really be together once you lose 20 pounds.” See, that’s what I told myself. “I’ll only get a boyfriend when I lose 20 pounds.” So if I recited that to myself then of course I believed it was the steadfast condition upon which I would find a mate. Then along comes Brad and the condition evaporates. It’s not because he loves me that I learned to love myself. It’s more like his love was a wake up call. I finally opened my damn eyes and got over the idea of only loving myself -20 pounds.

And then of course there’s running. Magical, beautiful, blissful running. I attribute a huge portion of my current happiness to my running habit. My feet make me grateful for my calves, and my calves for my knees, and my knees for my spine, and my butt, and my arms, and my lungs, and my eyes. I love running, and I need all of those things to run, therefore I love all of those things. The best thing I could have ever done for my body and self-esteem was to take the first step onto the running track.

So fast forward again to the engagement. Our relationship is built upon the foundation that we love each other as is. Warts and all. Or weight and all, in my case. If Brad’s nose fell off, or he grew a third arm, or his skin turned green, I would still love him. Those things would be weird, but I would love him. So now that we’re planning our wedding the condition, the code that I’ve always lived by which dictates that I must lose weight before accomplishing anything, that code is gone. It feels false, not to mention regressive, to reinstate it just because that’s what brides seem to do.

I’m happy, truly happy, with exactly the way I look right now. And it’s not the same as the volatile roller-coaster of happiness I was on before when my weight would go up and down and up. That happiness was dependent upon something external. This happiness comes from within. Yes I could stand to lose a few pounds to make my doctor happy, but that will come in time. After all I’m about to begin training for a marathon. Something is going to be lost. It might be my weight, it might be my dignity. Time will tell. For now I’m stable. For the first time in my entire life, my self-esteem is stable. I don’t get nervous to look in the mirror, not knowing if I will respond with adoration or disgust. I love every inch of my body and not because it’s thin, but because it keeps me healthy. It’s an absolute miracle, the only one of it’s kind.

Would I like to look the absolute ideal version of myself on my wedding day? Sure. Of course. But I’m not sweatin’ it. I know how my brain works. If I lost weight for my wedding day I would obsess over it. It would consume every thought from here until July 21st. It would make our day about how I look. I don’t want my wedding day to be about how I look. I want it to be about how I feel. And how Brad feels. And right now, I’m in love. Brad loves me just as I am. More importantly, I love me just as I am. I’m a bride. A bride takes a leap of faith in the name of goodness. A bride places the importance of another person’s life right alongside hers. A bride makes a declaration that love conquers, fear falters, and fidelity reigns. A bride (and groom) in love truly is the most ideal version of herself, and that ideal has nothing to do with size.

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Plus! There’s sound equipment that needs renting, and paper flowers that need making, and rehearsal dinner that needs planning, and ceremony readings that need picking, and hair that needs highlighting, and a mini-moon that needs booking, and gifts that need buying, and, And, AND! Yeah. I’ve got enough on my plate to not have to worry about what I’m eating off my plate.

Until next time.

Love,

Becky

 

 

 

MILEstones!!

Today Brad and I hit a major milestone, or, MILEstone, you might say. After this morning’s 3 mile run, we have officially hit the 3,000 mile mark! We’re getting so close to Tahiti!

 

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And man that was a hot run! We worked for it. Only 1,109 miles to go. After this weekend’s half marathon we’ll be in the 1,000’s!

Can you say…

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Have a great weekend everyone.

The Big Announcement

I’ve been hinting at a Big Announcement for a long time. Sorry about that. I know those were all teases. Well this one is no tease. I made good on my promise. I have an announcement, and it’s probably what you’re expecting. I just can’t concentrate on anything else until I make it known.

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And whenever I think about the fact that I’ve signed up for a full marathon, this…

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or this…

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or something like this…

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But hopefully when I’m done I’ll feel more like this:

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with a hefty dose of…

Mononoke did it

Ultimately what I’m hoping for is…

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Though I might make my way to the finish line doing something like….

crawl to the finishAnd once I’m done, pretty sure I’ll resemble…

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Shock. Amazement. Wonder. Fear. All things I’m feeling right now…

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I’m at the beginning of a journey; and whatever happens, it’s happening!

 

Have you run a full marathon? Tips for a first-timer? Please share in the comments!

 

How to Know if You Should Run a Marathon

Last week I bumped into a neighbor in our building and got to chatting about his experience having just finished the LA Marathon. To use his words, it was the hardest thing he’d ever done in his life, painful as hell, a humbling experience, amazing, and life changing. This sort of contradictory reflection is not uncommon I’m noticing. I myself have never run a marathon, though I’m sort of obsessing about it lately and trying to compute in my head whether I’ve got it in me. About 70% of the time I’ve got that optimistic runner’s brain that says “hell yes I can run that.” But there’s that 30% that throws me, and I’ll tell you what populates that 30%. The content is completely anecdotal. I hear stories from other runners about seeing people collapse, cry, vomit, and even go into cardiac arrest on the marathon course. Yes that’s probably rare but it’s still terrifying and begs the question: should we be running this kind of mileage? I hear women say things like “it was harder than giving birth” and all I can think is, well damn, why would I do THAT? I don’t even get a baby when I’m done. I’m not going to lie people, as much as runners proceed to talk out of the other side of their mouth using phrases like “life-changing,” “spiritual experience,” and “incredible,” the allure of those terms are not quite outweighing the fear of heart attacks, collapse, and vomiting in front of thousands of people (I’ve already done that, rather not repeat it, ask me to tell you the story sometime).

Ultimately I think I get it. As a runner I can understand the thin line between pain and pleasure. The sense that the accomplishment isn’t worth it unless it was earned through sweat and tears. We run BECAUSE it’s hard, not in spite of it. But I don’t know, this whole marathon thing seems to take that to a new level which leaves me wondering, is it necessary for me? Can I get that same feeling of achievement, accomplishment, pride, from my happy little half marathons? The problem is that I think the answer is no. We always have to top ourselves. We need a stronger fix to get the high! It’s no wonder that veteran marathoners often evolve into ultra-marathoners; but the truth is, we all do have a line that we really can’t cross without seriously endangering our health. We push that line, boy do we push it, but it will only bend so far. For some runners, that line is a 135 mile ultra-run through Death Valley in July. For Bruce Dern, who has run over 104,000 miles in his lifetime (he’s 77, you do the math) that line was to run from California to Colorado. Why stop there? For runners like Robert Garside, there pretty much is no line! He ran around the world.

So I guess what I’m really struggling with is not whether or not marathons are a healthy or smart thing to do. Thousands of people successfully complete marathons every year. The evidence suggests, overwhelmingly, that it’s possible. What I’m struggling with, what I don’t know is… where is my line?

There are a lot of things I don’t know about myself. I have of late been struggling with, to turn an overused phrase, an existential crisis. Questions eat away at me. What am I supposed to be doing with my life? What career should I really be pursuing? Do I really want to have children someday? What kind of actor am I? What is my myth? What is the story I’m meant to tell. Who the hell am I?

It’s all so annoying. Such first world problems,but they plague me. There are really two things I feel certain of right now in my life. I’m certain that I’m in love with Brad Light and want to spend the rest of my life with him. And I’m certain that I enjoy making Whimsy Dos and bringing a little floral beauty to the world. There are more ancillary certainties as well. I know my cats are the best cats. I love California and I never want to leave. I know I know I know that cilantro tastes like soap. Those small certainties comfort me, but the big questions remain.

I chip away at them. I try to breathe and remember that worrying about the questions often distracts us from the answer. I try to just live, because ultimately these are all rather western concerns. What I am supposed to be determines my success rate. My success rate determines my status in the world. My status in the world determines my value in the world. My value in the world is EVERYTHING. Very western. To quote my brother, “sometimes a beautiful sunset is more important.” I believe that. I do. I guess I can’t help but still succumb to the pressures of our little western definitions of identity. I do want to feel as though I’ve fulfilled some sort of destiny. Made a contribution. I’m turning 30 this year. So many of my friends have already done so much. Mothers, fathers, doctors, lawyers, physicists, teachers, movie stars. What have I done? Doesn’t feel like a lot.

Oy! Now I’m falling down an existential rabbit hole of doubt and self-pity. Not my intention! Wow, not the direction I thought this post would take, but what a discovery that is. I’m not going to edit it. All of this has been on my mind. I’ve been trying to work it out, and I’ve realized as I’ve put it into words that THAT is what that line represents for me. Running takes on metaphorical meaning in so many aspects of my life, this being no exception. So that line, that limit, whether it’s running a marathon or running around the world, where is it for me? What am I made of? What can I accomplish? Who am I? Not knowing has obviously been incredibly frustrating, on the course and off. So I guess there’s only one way to answer my own question. I have to run a marathon.